Thoughts on loving your child before it’s born

A weird concept of mine, which I’ve heard no one else describe, is the idea of loving your child before its born.  There’s always been this sense in me that the consequances of my actions now, on my unborn child, were very critical and a serious issue.  Taking this into consideration, I thought, showed great love for ones children, even though they are not born.  It showed a belief that a person can love a child before it’s born which, I think, is a great love, and one that’s seldom seen. 

I was always appalled by how people put themselves into positions where they may bring children into the world unplanned.  That has always been disgusting, revolting, unresponsible, and  ‘unacceptable’ to me.  Many times, I will lose a respect for someone when I find out someone behaves in this way . . . and, by all rights, I should!  I have seen too many children brought into this world ‘by accident’.  And then they are brought up in broken down family lives.  I have been disgusted how this is passed off as ‘that’s just the way it is’.  No, it isn’t!  It is irresponsible, immoral, and it places your unborn child into God-knows-what condition in life.  It’s not something to look at lightly.

It’s interesting that, in these past few years, I have admitted that one reason why I never got married when I was younger because I never felt I was competent to be a husband and, especially, to be a father.  As a result, I never pursued those paths.  I was not in a fit mental state at that time.  Because of this, I felt that I’d put my own children in a bad situation.  I did not want to do this.  Even though they were not born I felt responsible for them and was worried for their welfare. 

I’ve always felt that my stance of loving the child before it’s born has shown more love in me of my own child (which is unborn) than most fathers I’ve seen.  By doing this, it seems, I’m more of a father than many fathers are.

This entry was posted in Life in general, Male and female, Psychology and psychoanalysis and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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