Category Archives: The U.S. and American society

Thoughts on “reverse discrimination”, a new form of “justified” discrimination

Here’s a thought I had: There is something which I call “reverse discrimination”.  This is a unique and bizarre phenomena.  For some reason, I’ve always had a hard time explaining it.  In the simplist words, I’d say that it is the accusation of someone … Continue reading

Posted in Historical stuff, Modern life and society, Society, The effects of WWII, the Nazi's, the Holocaust, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War era protests, The U.S. and American society | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Thoughts about “living in the shadow” and its effects

Here’s a thought I had: There are, oftentimes, big events in history events that make an incredible impact.  Some are incredibly large and have great influence.  Sometimes, they are so big that it dictates the era that follows it.  I call this … Continue reading

Posted in Current affairs and events, Historical stuff, Modern life and society, The effects of WWII, the Nazi's, the Holocaust, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War era protests, The U.S. and American society | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Thoughts on the ‘assembly-line life’ and the ‘assembly-line scholar’, with remarks about “the environment of truth”

Here’s a thought I had: In a conversation recently I spoke of the fact that we are in the era of the ‘assembly-line scholar’.  That is to say, they have made it so that scholars or, rather, students, are coming out … Continue reading

Posted in Education and learning, Modern life and society, Philosophy, Psychology and psychoanalysis, The U.S. and American society | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Thoughts on the “post war reaction” – the effects of the “war cause authority”

Here’s a thought I had: It seems that war tends to cause a reaction following the war.  I call it the “post war reaction”. I should point out that in this article I will primarily focus on the effects caused … Continue reading

Posted in Battle trauma, Culture, cultural loneliness, etc., Historical stuff, Society, The military and war, The U.S. and American society | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Thoughts on “the addiction” – aspects of the technology addiction

Here’s a thought I had: In a previous article I wrote of my early experiences with computers (Some thoughts on my early experience with computers).  Basically, in 1979 or 1980 I got my own personal computer.  You could play computer games … Continue reading

Posted in Children and play, Historical stuff, Modern life and society, Psychology and psychoanalysis, Science and technology, The effects of WWII, the Nazi's, the Holocaust, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War era protests, The U.S. and American society | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Thoughts on my reaction to an American form of the “culture of sycophant’s” – the “yupi” (yuppie) movement and aspects about it

I was brought up in a society influenced by the “culture of sycophant’s” (see my article “More thoughts on the bourgeoisie mentality – the influence of the “culture of sychophant’s”“).  Over the years, its become clear that the sycophant lifestyle has had … Continue reading

Posted in Historical stuff, Modern life and society, The U.S. and American society, Victorianism, Bourgeoisie, noble imitation, and sycophancy | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

More thoughts on the bourgeoisie mentality – the influence of the “culture of sychophant’s”

Recently, some more ideas have appeared concerning the early origin and growth of the bourgeoisie mentality.  I wrote some early thoughts in this article:  “Thoughts on “bourgeois society” – its effects, problems, and reactions toward it“.  Of course, its all speculation (as … Continue reading

Posted in Britain and British things, Culture, cultural loneliness, etc., Historical stuff, Imitation and the problems it creates, Modern life and society, Royalty, The U.S. and American society, Victorianism, Bourgeoisie, noble imitation, and sycophancy | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment